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How the Model Works

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How the Model Works
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Mathematical Equations

Since 1993 Archimedes scientists have analyzed many clinical trials and observational, epidemiological, and retrospective studies to derive hundreds of equations that mathematically represent physiological pathways and the effects of multiple diseases, tests, and treatments.

The Archimedes Model was built to represent physiological, clinical, and administrative events as they occur in reality. In this way it is very different from statistical models such as predictive models and calculators based on regression equations, and from state transition models such as Markov models.

The equations are integrated into a single, large-scale simulation model using object-oriented programming. Attached to these equations are algorithms that realistically simulate the healthcare system, including processes such as tests, treatments, admissions, and physician behaviors.

The Archimedes Model runs on a distributed computing network. This enables the Model to rapidly calculate the effects of interventions on biological outcomes, health outcomes, utilization, quality of life, and financial costs.

Validation is accomplished by simulating clinical trials and comparing the results to outcomes seen in real populations. More...

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Populations

The Model can create simulated populations that match real populations at a high level of detail. If person-specific data are available, the Model can create copies of real people one by one, matching specific individuals on more than 40 clinically relevant variables.

Interventions

The Archimedes Model can simulate a wide spectrum of interventions. By adjusting biomarkers and processes, the interventions realistically mimic the effects of drugs, prevention programs, screening tests, diagnostic tests, care processes and protocols, compliance, performance, and guidelines.

Outcomes

The Model can calculate the effects of interventions on biological outcomes, health outcomes, utilization, quality of life, and financial costs. The use of a single integrated model also makes it possible to compare variables and set priorities consistently across a broad spectrum of interventions that affect different diseases, organ systems, and outcomes.

For a detailed explanation on how the Model works, how it is validated, and how equations are derived, watch our informative webinars.



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